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Sigil

Type Demiplane
Native(s) Any
Alignment Trait None
Physical Traits:
Gravity Normal
Time Normal
Shape & Size Ring-shaped
6.4 miles (diameter)
20 miles (circumference)
Morphic Trait None
Faith Trait None
Elemental & Energy Traits None
Magic Trait None

Sigil (pronounced /'sɪg.ɪl/) is a city-state in the multiverse.

Sigil is believed by some to be located inside of Cynosure, a plane outside of the Realmspace crystal sphere. It has the shape of a torus; the city itself is located on the inner surface of the ring. There is no sky, simply an all-pervasive light that waxes and wanes to create day and night. Sigil cannot be entered or exited save via portals; although this makes it quite safe from any would-be invader, it also makes it a prison of sorts for those not possessing a portal key. Thus, many call Sigil "The Bird Cage" or "The Cage". Though Sigil is commonly held to be located "at the center of the planes" (where it is positioned atop the infinitely tall Spire), some argue that this is impossible since the planes are infinite in all dimensions, and therefore there can never truly be a center to any of them, let alone all of them; thus, Sigil is of no special importance. Curiously, from the Outlands one can see Sigil atop the supposedly infinite Spire.


Sigil contains innumerable portals: any bounded opening (a doorway, an arch, a barrel hoop, a picture frame) could possibly be a portal to another plane, or to another point in Sigil itself. Thus, the city is a paradox: it touches all planes at once, yet ultimately belongs to none; from these characteristics it draws its other name: "The City of Doors."


The ruler of Sigil is the mysterious Lady of Pain. The Lady is sometimes seen in Sigil as a floating, robed Lady with a face bearing a mantle of blades. The Lady does not concern herself with the laws of the city; she typically only interferes when something threatens the stability of Sigil itself. However, she is an entity of inscrutable motives, and often those who cross her path, even accidentally, are flayed to death or teleported to her hidden Mazes, lost forever. It is widely believed that she never speaks, although some unconfirmed (and, most would argue, highly questionable) rumours to the contrary do exist.


Sigil is, theoretically, a completely neutral ground: no wars are waged there and no armies pass through. Furthermore, no deities can enter into Sigil; the Lady has barred them from the Cage. Of course, Sigil is hardly peaceful; with such a condensed population, consisting of everything from angelic devas to demonic glabrezu, violence is common, usually befalling the foolhardy, the incautious, or the poor. Most natives of Sigil ("Cagers") are quite jaded as a result of living there.


People coming to Sigil from the Prime Material Plane are often treated as clueless inferiors by the planar elitists who dwell there. They are thus widely referred to as the "Clueless", "Berks" or more charitably, as "Primes".

Administrative Divisions

Sigil is divided into six wards:

  • The Hive Ward, the slum and the ghetto, home to the poor, the rogues, and the unwanted dregs of the city.
  • The Lower Ward, an industrial district, clogged up with the smoke from the foundries and from the portals to the Lower Planes.
  • The Clerk's Ward, an affluent district, home to most of the city's lower-rung bureaucrats and middlemen.
  • The Market and Guildhall Wards are the home to the traders, craftsmen, artisans, guild members and other members of the middle class.
  • The Lady's Ward, the richest and most exclusive section of the city, is home to the elites of society and of its government.


Scroll

Sigil is located atop the Spire in the Outlands. It has the shape of a torus; the city itself is located on the inner surface of the ring. There is no sky, simply an all-pervasive light that waxes and wanes to create day and night. Sigil cannot be entered or exited save via portals; although this makes it quite safe from any would-be invader, it also makes it a prison of sorts for those not possessing a portal key. Thus, sometimes Sigil is called "The Cage". Though Sigil is pseudo-geographically located "at the center of the planes" (where it is positioned atop the infinitely tall Spire), scholars argue that this is impossible since the planes are infinite in all dimensions, and therefore there can never truly be a center to any of them, let alone all of them; thus, Sigil is of no special importance. Curiously, from the Outlands one can see Sigil atop the supposedly infinite Spire.


Sigil contains innumerable portals that can lead to anywhere in the Dungeons & Dragons cosmology: any bounded opening (a doorway, an arch, a barrel hoop, a picture frame) could possibly be a portal to another plane, or to another point in Sigil itself. Thus, the city is a paradox: it touches all planes at once, yet ultimately belongs to none; from these characteristics it draws its other name: "The City of Doors".


The ruler of Sigil is the mysterious Lady of Pain. The Lady is sometimes seen in Sigil as a floating, robed Lady with a face bearing a mantle of blades. The Lady does not concern herself with the laws of the city; she typically only interferes when something threatens the stability of Sigil itself. However, she is an entity of inscrutable motives, and often those who cross her path, even accidentally, are flayed to death or teleported to her hidden Mazes, lost forever. It is widely believed that she never speaks, although some unconfirmed (and, most would argue, highly questionable) rumours to the contrary do exist. Sigil is also highly morphic, allowing its leader to alter the city at her whim.


Sigil is, theoretically, a completely neutral ground: no wars are waged there and no armies pass through. Furthermore, no powers (such as deities) can enter into Sigil; the Lady has barred them from the Cage, though some disguised avatars have made it in and been promptly dispatched by the lady. It is also of great interest to them, as they could use Sigil to send their worshippers anywhere, and it is at the center of the Outer Planes. Of course, Sigil is hardly peaceful; with such a condensed population, consisting of everything from angelic devas to demonic glabrezu, violence is common, usually befalling the foolhardy, the incautious, or the poor. Most natives of Sigil ("Cagers") are quite jaded as a result of living there.


People coming to Sigil from the Prime Material Plane are often treated as clueless inferiors by the planar elitists who dwell there. They are thus widely referred to as the "Clueless", or more charitably, as "Primes".


Sigil is divided into six districts, called wards:


* The Hive Ward, the slum and the ghetto, home to the poor, the rogues, and the unwanted dregs of the city.

* The Lower Ward, an industrial district, clogged up with the smoke from the foundries and from the portals to the Lower Planes.

* The Clerk's Ward, an affluent district, home to most of the city's lower-rung bureaucrats and middlemen.

* The Market and Guildhall Wards are the home to the traders, craftsmen, artisans, guild members and other members of the middle class.

* The Lady's Ward, the richest and most exclusive section of the city, is home to the elites of society and of its government.

(the above information from Wikipedia)


Factions and Organizations


Factions as described in the original boxed setting. The Faction Wars never happened.


If the organization has a base of operations, it is listed in parentheses.


The Steeple - (Lady's) An association of Celestials dedicating to helping the impoverished and downtrodden.

The Playground - (Lower) A business run by Devils, known for its hedonistic tendencies.

The Underworld - (Unknown) Sigil's most successful crime "family." All of its known important members are intelligent undead.

Universal Education Center (Clerks) - Sparsely populated building dedicated to helping all intelligent beings better themselves--mostly they distribute pamphlets.

Celestial Bureaucracy, Sigillian Office - (Clerks) the local connection for the "Chinese" mythology.

Planewalker's Guild - (Market) Headquarters is on the Infinite Staircase, but they have a thriving hall in Sigil.

Winter Circus - Performance artists a la the Cacophony Society.

The Orpheum - (Guildhall) Sigil's bardic university, containing 12 separate colleges.

Venturans - (Hive) Combatants who have survived at least 5 fights at Venture's (gladiatorial fighting arena). A brotherhood of killers.

Thrice-Damned - (Lower) A small association of beings who provide paralegal substances such as addictive drugs and poisons.

Brotherhood of the Notched Blade - (Lower) Veteran soldiers who gather at the Notched Blade private club in the Lower Ward.

Path of Enlightenment - (Lady's) A multidenominational monastery and retreat.

Gardener's Rest - (Market) An Inn catering to nature-lovers.


Most deities have some followers in Sigil, and there are over a thousand temples and shrines.



The Lady, her Mazes, and the Dabus


In a place where almost anything and everything can mingle, tempers can run high. It's a tough bit for a lesser baatezu to stand aside, just to let the procession of a greater tanar'ri pass down the street - a fiend don't forget the way of the Blood War so easily. 'Course, it's no easier for good creatures, either. There's lots of times an agathion can't see past the fact that a berk just ain't good-aligned. Then there's the factions. Each one's got its own plans, and most times those plans don't include any rivals.


Add to all this the good old-fashioned cross-trade and the Cage's got all the potential to be total anarchy. That'd suit the Revolutionary League and probably the Xaositects well, but it don't do other sods much good.


Sigil isn't anarchy, though, and there's a number of things that keep it from the brink. Namely: the Lady of Pain, her Mazes, and the dabus.


The Lady

The high-up man in Sigil, the one who ultimately watches over the Cage, is the Lady of Pain. She's not a woman and she's not human - nobody's quite sure what she is. The best guess is she's a power, probably a greater power, but there's also a theory that she's a reformed tanar'ri lord, if such a thing's possible.


Whatever else she is, she's the Lady of Pain, and given that, most other facts are extraneous.


For the most part the Lady (as she's called) keeps distant from the squalid hurly-burly of the Cage. She doesn't have a house, a palace, or a temple. Nobody worships her, and with good reason: Those that say prayers to her name get found with their skins flayed off - a big discouragement to others. Sometimes she's seen drifting through the streets, the edge of her gown just brushing over the cobblestones. She never speaks. Those who try interfering with her erupt in horrid gashes at just the touch of her gaze. Wise bloods find business elsewhere on those rare times she passes down the way. Eventually, her image fades and she vanishes into nothingness. Natives of Sigil view her with fearful awe, as she's the uncaring protector of their home.


She doesn't give out missions, she never grants powers to anyone, and they can't rob her temples because she hasn't got any.


The Lady of Pain, just by being there, makes all things possible. She's the one who gets the credit for several effects that make Sigil (and the entire planescape campaign setting) what it is. She's the one who makes Sigil safe for characters of all experience levels. She's the one who blocks the powers from Sigil. She's the one whose influence prevents gate spells from working and shields Sigil from the Astral Plane. She's the one who creates the Mazes that trap Sigil's would-be conquerors.


Little else is known about the Lady’s origins or history, but a few of her behaviors follow a pattern. The Lady never speaks. Some say that she just doesn’t waste her time talking to those who aren’t her equals - and any equals would be cast into a Maze.


The statistical indexes and compilations of the Guvners have also established the fact that when the dabus are disturbed, the Lady’s mind is troubled. How the dabus know, however, is a question that brings no useful answer from the mute dabus.


The Mazes

The Mazes are the grandest of all Sigil's punishments, and the Lady of Pain saves them for the worst threats to her power.

They're a part and yet not a part of the city, and no sane basher wants to go there. The Mazes are the Lady's special birdcages for the would-be power mongers of Sigil.


The Mazes are just that: mazes. There's a difference between them and some of the more confused sections of the Cage, of course, or they'd not be much of a punishment. For starters, they aren't exactly part of Sigil. When the Lady creates a new part of the Mazes, a small piece of the city - an alley or a courtyard, for example - copies itself and becomes a tiny little demiplane.


A portal of her making then carries the copy into the heart of the Deep Ethereal. There, it grows into an endless twisting maze that's got no beginning or end. It just doubles back forever on itself. (Actually, the Guvners insist that the Mazes are still part of Sigil, even though they're in the Ethereal, so even their location is a mind-maze.)


A sod sentenced to the Mazes never knows it until it's too late. Sometimes they form around him just as he's passing through some particularly deserted part of the city; he turns a corner and the next intersection's not the way he remembers it, and by that time it's too late. Those that figure the Lady's after them - the ambitious and the cunning - try clever ways to avoid her traps.


Some of them never leave their palaces so they never enter a blind alley, and others only travel with groups so they're never caught alone, but it never works. A basher walks down an empty hall in his house, only to discover a maze of rooms that didn't exist before. And sooner or later a berk turns his back to his friends, and when he looks back they're all gone. The Mazes'll always get a sod, no matter how careful he is.


Just spitting her rivals into the Deep Ethereal's not enough for the Lady of Pain, either. Each little chunk of the Mazes that's kicked out is sealed oneway from planar travel - things can get in with a spell, but things can't get back out. For instance, food and water always appear so the prisoner won't starve. But worst of all, those in the Mazes know there's a way out, as the Lady of Pain always leaves a single portal back to Sigil hidden somewhere. Maybe it's so the dabus can check on things if needed, and maybe it's just to torture the sod who's trapped there.


'Course, since that portal's there, it's not impossible to escape the Mazes - hard, yes, but not impossible. Maybe a berk gets lucky and finds the portal. Maybe his friends have got the jink to mount a rescue. After all, they only have to find where the portal opens in Sigil or else track down the demiplane in the Deep Ethereal. How hard can that be?


The Dabus

The dabus are the servants of our Dread Lady, Her Serenity the Lady of Pain. Her will is their will. They are also Sigil’s first settlers, more native than the planars who just happen to be born here. There are no records, no tales, not even rumors of a time in Sigil when the dabus were not present, silently watching over the City of Doors. They're unique to the Cage, never found anywhere else in the planes. In other words, the dabus never leave Sigil. From this, bloods figure the dabus are actually living manifestations of the city, which makes sense since the beings maintain most of the infrastructure that makes the city work.


Some of the wise say that the dabus built Sigil, and that’s why they serve it as no other Cagers do. Dabus seem to consider Sigil their master as much as the Lady, for they are forever patching and fixing it, laying cobbles, digging for pipes, trimming back razorvine, roofing city buildings, whitewashing, and sweeping the streets. Likewise, they often tear down sections and build over streets that they find unworthy (for reasons known only to themselves). Oddly, when the dabus are questioned they claim that the city itself created them.

No one’s quite clear on what they mean by this, and they rarely elaborate. The few vague explanations they do offer are completely obscure. To most, the dabus are nothing more than cryptic workmen.


However, some berks discover another side of their duties, because the dabus also work as agents of the Lady of Pain.

Sometimes they appear to punish those knights who've gotten too forward in their plans, and sometimes they arrive in force to put down riots, but they're not concerned with normal crime. It's the factions that are left to deal with the thieves and murderers in Sigil. The dabus only show up when there's a threat to their Lady, and that's usually a sign that another one of the Mazes is about to appear.


The homes of the dabus are deep underground; some Cagers say that the entire torus is a warren of dabus, and the part of Sigil on its surface is only the face the city shows to the Ring, to travelers. The actual city is a maze of deep tunnels, storehouses, dungeons, and corridors that have remained entirely proof against invasion for eons upon eons. Others (perhaps less prone to exaggeration, perhaps less willing to see the truth) claim that the dabus’ supposed warrens are no deeper than fox dens or slaad nests: shallow diggings that are simply refuges for the dabus. The darkest rumors claim that the dabus wish to restore the pristine state the city exhibited before other races traveled the planes, when the Cage was entirely under the dabus’ control.


The Code of Conduct

So what's a blood got to do to avoid the Lady's attention? What are the laws of Sigil?


There aren't many.


Sigil's a place where anyone and anything can happen, and a lot of it does. The Lady of Pain's not interested in the petty squabbles of day-today affairs. A murder here, a mugging there - that's not her concern because the Harmonium can take care of it. The Lady of Pain only takes action against threats to the security of Sigil, and that means her security.


The things she won't tolerate include a berk trying to break open the portals so a power can enter, finding a way around her astral barrier, slaughtering the dabus, tearing the city down stone by stone, or inciting general rebellion against her rule. These aren't the deeds most bashers are likely to try, so most often the Lady just exists in her peaceful fierceness.


It is possible to get put in her dead-book for less than Sigil-shattering deeds, though. All a berk's got to do is make the folks of Sigil question the Lady's power. Too many killings or crimes'll make the folks of Sigil nervous and fearful, and they'll start wondering if she's got the means to protect them. Given that, it's no surprise that the dabus start looking real hard for the criminal. Lasting power comes from keeping the population happy.


It'd seem natural that the factions would always be threatening the Lady's power, too. After all, each one's got their own idea of just what's proper and right for Sigil, and these are ideas that don't always include the Lady of Pain at the top of things. Fact is, if they go too far she'll crack them like beetles. Now, the factols are wise enough to see that Sigil's a safe haven from their enemies, besides being the best way to get around, and no faction wants to get itself spun out of Sigil. Philosophies who foolishly challenge the Lady's power get Mazes all their own. Given the choice of not holding a given idea or winding up in the Mazes, it's easy to see why some philosophies have died off. The most often told tale's about the Communals, sods who held that everything belonged to everyone, including the Lady's share of the power. One day, everyone in the Communal headquarters (the City Provisioner's) vanished. The best guess is they were all trapped into one Maze in the Ethereal Plane. Pretty quick, no cutter admitted being a Communal, but it's said there's still a small colony of true believers out on the Astral somewhere.


Given that example, it's no surprise the factions police their own.

The Hall of Information

An adjunct to the Hall of Records, the Hall of Information may be Sigil’s most valuable resource. It provides general information about government operations, cultural affairs, and private sector services; Cagers and visitors with routine questions are directed here.


Among the services the Hall may be able to provide are:

Locating a missing relative.

Giving directions to a Lower Ward inn.

Recommending a reputable pawnbroker in the

Mediating a dispute with a merchant.

Petitioning for government employment.

Rectifying a mistaken tax assessment.

Explaining the status of a civil war in Acheron.

Arranging a meeting with a wealthy landowner.


Located midway between the Hall of Speakers and the Hall of Records, the Hall of Information’s a stately edifice of blue marble edged in onyx, its sparkling crystal windows framed in turquoise. A pair of marble ramps leading inside runs between three marble columns. The words on each column (one per capital) taken together summarize the Hall’s credo: COOPERATION, COMPLIANCE, and CONTROL. (Take care not to lean too hard on the COOPERATION column; it’s been weakened by structural flaws and is about ready to collapse. The Bureau of City Services has issued a statement that repair is imminent.)


Inside, a steward’ll arrange an appointment with the appropriate official and collect the fee, when applicable. After cutters make an appointment, they may look around a bit, so long as they speak in hushed tones, avoid disturbing any of the officers, keep their hands off the clean walls, and stay away from the chief, Bordon Mok. A force of Mercykiller guards keeps an eye out for troublemakers. In Bordon’s defense, let it be noted that hers is a difficult job, demanding a firm hand and unwavering focus. And she performs her duties well. During her three decades as chief, the Hall of Information’s been a model of efficiency.


But as a person – more precisely, as a bariaur – she’s foul-tempered and frightening. If she has affection for any living creature, she’s kept it to herself. In the rigidity of her beliefs, Bordon isn’t so different from other Takers. She contends that society’s outcasts are victims of their own laziness, that the strong’re meant to dominate the weak. But Bordon takes the philosophy of the Fated to an extreme. She believes fear breeds loyalty and compassion’s a character flaw. She intimidates her Hall officers with vicious insults – she refers to the Portal Registrar as “my little cranium rat,” his children as “ratlings” – and lashes ’em with a silver whip if they fail to bow when she walks by. (If Bordon hadn’t arranged for the Hall officers to receive handsome salaries, it’s unlikely that any’d remain in her employ for more than a few weeks.) She despises the Harmonium, and considers primes an especially repugnant species of vermin. She trusts no one, colleagues included, and is rumoured to have evidence of immoral acts conducted by several of Sigil’s most respected Cagers, which she intends to use as blackmail. Make no mistake – Bordon’s neither dishonest nor deceptive: She’s consumed by hatred. The reason? It may be a consequence of her appearance. A small pair of ram’s horns grow from her head – almost unheard of in female bariaur – making her the target of ridicule since childhood. All efforts to eradicate the horns have failed; they always grow back.


Touring the Hall

All interior walls and floors’re made of polished blue marble, illuminated by aquamarine chandeliers. Every surface is spotless. Footsteps and muttered conversations echo in the otherwise silent hallways. A faint aroma of apples hangs in the air.


In the foyer, a friendly but distant steward sits behind a high desk made of black marble. Giant silver hands rise on either side of the steward’s desk, cupping in their palms the pink incense whence comes the apple scent that fills the Hall. To discourage loitering, there’re no chairs or benches. Six Mercykiller guards roam the corridors at all times, watching for signs of violence from impatient visitors or dissatisfied clients. The guards won’t speak with anyone other than the officers, the steward, and the staff.


Three administrative aides called carriers, identifiable by red shoulder sashes, are always on duty in the Hall. Once per hour, the carriers make the office rounds, picking up messages and notes, then delivering them to other offices, the steward, or the astral streaker room (see “The Dark: Astral Streakers”). They also pick up waste bins and dispose of refuse in the incinerator. (A 6-foot-diameter oval mirror hanging on the wall of the incineration room is actually a portal to the Elemental Plane of Fire. The word “incinerate” acts as a key to open the portal; carriers and guards know this key, as does Bordon Mok. The portal is used for the disposal of waste material and sensitive documents.) When they complete their rounds, the carriers retum to the lounge.


All the offices are identical. Each contains a black marble desk for the officer, three smaller desks for the staff (an officer has 1-4 staff members on duty at any given time, usually 0- or 1st-level fighters of the same race and faction as the officer), shelves stacked with reference materials, and two chairs for clients. When an officer’s got a message to deliver to another office or another building elsewhere in Sigil, he places it inside a hinged wooden box beside the door. Refuse goes into a waste bin next to the message box. Carriers in the corridor retrieve the messages and refuse by reaching through slots in the wall. A wall panel opens in the corridor, allowing a carrier to remove the waste bin. (See the map for the location of specific offices.)


Bordon Moks spacious office doubles as her living quarters. The furnishings are similar to those in the other offices – enderpine desk, reference shelves, message box, waste bin – but the room also includes a feather mattress, a clothes cabinet, a ceramic wash basin, and a crystal fish tank (filled with Automata guppies: tiny metal-finned, silver-scaled, goggle-eyed swimmers). In the comer is a barrel of mistberry wine, her favourite drink (fetched by her carriers from Benni’a Tap Room in the Hive Ward). An arched iron tunnel, about 20 feet long, leads to the doorway of a huge iron vault.


Hall of Information DirectoryAssociation of Heralds and Criers: Disseminates material from the Hall of Records and Hall of Speakers intended for public consumption.

--Processing Fee: None.


Bureau of City Services: Explains duties of government offices, including law enforcement, tax collection, social services, construction projects, and housing. Tells where to find officials.

--Processing Fee: None.


Bureau of Commerce: Oversees merchants, traders, and craftsmen. Provides information regarding availability of goods and services.

--Processing Fee: None.


Bureau of Customs and Traditions: Provides information to visitors regarding Sigil customs and traditions.

--Processinq Fee: None.


Bureau of Learning: Referral service for mentors, sages, and teachers. Oversees libraries.

--Processing Fee: 3 sp.


Charity Commision: Responsible for registration of all charities. Monitors resource distribution. Site inspection. Investigates misconduct and mismanagement.

--Processing Fee: None.


Department of Arbitration: Encourages fair trading, product safety, and quality assurance. Sets trade standards. Locates professional arbitrators to mediate between buyers and sellers.

--Processing Fee: 1 gp.


Department of Employment: Registers employment agencies, interviews applicants (by arrangement with employer). Some hiring for city positions.

--Processing Fee: 1 sp.


Health Commission: Maintains registry of hospices and healers. Certifies treatments.

--Processing Fee: None.


Inner Planes Relations: Oversees affairs on Inner Planes pertaining to Sigil, including trade regulations, diplomatic arrangements, and treaties. Tourist information also available.

--Processing Fee: 8 sp.


Land Registry: Provides names of Sigil landowners, along with lists of their properties. (Information may not be distributed without landowner’s written permission.)

--Processing Fee: 5 sp.


Ministry of Public Rolls and Records: Distributes selected government records, most of a statistical nature. Provides reading rooms (1 cp/hour, limit of 8 hours/day unless reader receives special approval).

--Processing Fee: 1 sp.


Ministry of War: Provides information regarding status of known conflicts in all planes. Receives inquiries of mercenaries and weapon dealers. Queries regarding Sigil defense policies also answered.

--Processing Fee: 5 sp.


Nonplanar Races Commission: Registry of services for all nonplanar races (those other than bariaur, githzerai, human, half-elf, and tiefling), including such pertaining to health, housing, and food. Provides information regarding nonplanar racial organizations, societies, and social groups.

--Processing Fee: 1 gp.


Outer Planar Relations: Services similar to Inner Planes Relations, as pertaining to Outer Planes.

--Processing Fee: 8 sp.


Outlands Relations: Services similar to Inner Planes as pertaining to Outlands.

--Processing Fee: 5 sp


Portal Registry: Distributes information regarding location and accessibility of known portals in Sigil available to general public. Limited information regarding portals outside of Sigil also available.

--Processing Fee: 5 gp.


Priest’s Registry: Voluntary registry of priests, including specialties and services. Monitors current location of all registrants.

--Processing Fee: 5 sp.


Prime Material Plane Relations: Services similar to Inner Planes Relations, as pertaining to Prime Material Plane.

--Processing Fee: 8 sp.


Taxation Bureau: Reviews tax problems. Assesses special fees. Arbitrates taxation disputes.

--Processing Fee: 5 sp.


Wizard’s Registry: Services similar to the Priest’s Registry, as pertaining to wizards.

--Processing Fee: 5 sp.


Wererat Ward

Character. Life, the most precious of the multiverse's treasures, can be had in unending supply, but only for the chosen few. How many minds in all the worlds are brave enough, intelligent enough, and respectful enough to merit true life eternal? How ironic, and yet how predictable, that the only creatures truly capable of appreciating such a great gift and the skill that went into finding it are dismissed as skulking vermin by the fools outside. There will be a price to pay for their ignorance and arrogance, all in due time. And what is time for such as we? To master life is to master infinity.

Ruler. The Wererat Ward is a theocracy controlled by a secretive hierarchy of shaman-priests. The high priest is Kiri Walks-with-Life (Pl/female wererat mummy/LE), a female wererat with blonde fur, so fat that she moves like a lumbering, eerily silent hill.

Behind the Throne. The true ruler of the Wererat Ward is an entity known to the ratmen as the Great Old One and the Dweller Beneath, and worshipped by them as a god. In fact, the Dweller was once a spellcaster living on a world on the material plane, possibly Toril. This mage, whose name has been lost along with his original body, was obsessed with the quest for everlasting life. Delving into the traditional necromantic scrolls of his people as none had before, he was still dissatisfied. He searched further, his spells disseminating the very foundations of living things. Inspired, he found spells that allowed him to travel beyond his reality into the inner planes of existence. There he found the positive energy plane, and knew that if he could discover a way to channel its power directly to his body he would truly have life everlasting.

His tool for gaining unending life was, ironically, death. To build his gate, he rounded up hundreds of slaves and had them killed on a ceremonial altar. As their souls left their bodies, their life energy left as well, seeking its origin in the inner planes. The mage's spells followed it, and used the power to open a portal into the positive energy plane. The spellcaster's blood-encrusted hall exploded with light, and he allowed himself to luxuriate a moment in the envigorating force before concentrating on forging a permenent link.

In the midst of casting, the life energy became too much, and the mage's mortal shell exploded. His soul, however, firmly woven with contingency spells and experimental magicks, remained conscious, aware, and strangely enchanted.

The nameless mage found that, in his altered state, he was now able to enter the bodies of other living creatures and dominate them, the flow of life keeping it young and beautiful for as long as his spirit remained within. Not undead, but lich-like in his way, the mage captured the body of a powerful noble (unable yet to penetrate the shields around the nation's ruler). Soaked in the inner planar energy, he founded a city and populated it with mummies of those who gave their lives to him, where he ruled for many years before finally being driven out by wrathful dwarves. With the last of the surviving mummies the lich cursed the dwarves with a magical plague and retreated to the outer planes, searching for a way to gain more power. About the same time the last of the dwarves sucumbed to the plague the lich found the city of Sigil and its myriad doors. Finding this place to his liking, he tunneled underground and there built a replica of his foul city in his undying insanity.

The Dweller Beneath, a positive lich: CR 22; Medium Monstrous Humanoid (6'7" tall); HD 18d8; hp 101; Init +0; Spd 30 ft; AC 15 (natural); Atk +12/7 melee (1d8+5 touch); SA damaging touch, aura of menace, mummy bloom, spells; SQ Damage reduction 15/+1, immunities, spell-like abilities; SR 4; AL LE; SV Fort +8, Ref +6, Will +15; Str 15, Dex 11, Con 14, Int 20, Wis 16, Cha 18. Skills: Alchemy +23, Concentration +20, Craft (Sclulpture) +16, Craft (Stonemasonry +20, Knowledge (arcana) +23, Knowledge (religion) +10, Scry +14, Spellcraft +23, Hide +8, Listen +8, Move Silently +18, Sense Motive +18, Search +10, Spot +18 Feats: Combat Casting, Spell Focus: Evocation, Spell Focus: Necromancy, Craft W ondrous Item, Scribe Scroll, Silent Spell, Quicken Spell, Silent Spell, Still Spell, Leadership, Spell Mastery x4 (5) SA - Immunities (Ex): Positive liches are immune to light, electricity, death magic, and mind-affecting attacks. They have no need to eat, sleep, or breathe. SA - Spell-like Abilities (Sp): At will -- light; 5x/day -- cure light wounds, contagion, change self; as spells cast by 20th-level wizard. SA - Steal Body (Su): If the positive lich's host body dies, the essence of the creature must take a host with Hit Die or levels at least equal to the positive lich's minus 15. In this case, 5. If the victim is unable to resist or gives his or her body willingly, no saving throw is allowed against the transformation. If the victim is able to resist, a Will save at DC 11 is allowed against the takeover. Failure displaces the life force of the victim; it cannot be raised, ressurected, or even restored with a wish spell until the positive lich is exorcised from its new body. If the host body is destroyed, the positive lich has one hour to inhabit another body or its spirit disperses into nothingness. In this form, a dispel evil or holy word can destroy it forever. SA - Aura of Menace: (Su): Those in the company of a ka-mummy feel a powerful force radiating about them in tense situations. Any hostile creature within a 20-foot radius must succeed at a Will save (DC 14) to resist its effects. Those who fail suffer a -2 morale penalty to attacks, AC, and saves for one day or until they successfully hit the positive lich that generated the aura. A creature that has resisted or broken the effect cannot be affected again by a positive lich's aura for one day. SA - Mummy Bloom (Su): Supernatural disease--slam, Fortitude save (DC 20), incubation period 1 day; victim is consumed by dimly glowing mold, losing 1 point of constitution per day. At Constitution 0, the corpse of the victim erupts in pale blossoms, dripping with blood. Wizard Spells: Alarm, Animate Rope, Burning Hands, Charm Person, Detect Undead, Endure Elements, Expeditious Retreat, Hold Portal, Identify, Mage Armor, Magic Missile, Message, Obscuring Mist, Shocking Grasp, Glitterdust, Lightning Bolt, Protection from Elements, Sepia Snake Sigil, Suggestion, Rary's Mnemonic Enhancer, Shout, Stoneskin, Wall of Fire, Teleport, Wall of Force, Wall of Iron, Wall of Stone, Mass Haste, Mass Suggestion, Move Earth, True Seeing, Insanity, Limited Wish, Power Word Stun, Prismatic Spray, Prismatic Wall, Sunburst, Trap the Soul, Foresight, Inprisonment, Mordenkainen's Disjunction, Prismatic Sphere, Refuge, Shapechange, Soul Bind, Wish. Equipment: Ring of Blinking, Ring of Wizardry (IV), Ring of Three Wishes (one remaining), Rod of enemy detection, Rod of Lordly Might, Spellbook.

The positive lich is an unholy amalgamation of the human body and energy from the Positive Energy Plane. Upon transformation into a positive lich, the essence of the wizard is converted to positive energy that needs a human body to inhabit. This energy sustains the body indefininitely. Each time a positive lich gains a level or is reduced to zero hit points, however, it must find a new body as the old one is devoured by the flames of its own fevered, unnatural life.

Description. Deep beneath the earth, mineral, wood and bone of Sigil's Clerks' Ward, cut off from the rest of UnderSigil except through portals, is a city within a city, an architectural wonder of stone and clay carved in a style some would call Mulhorandi, and some Egyptian.

The primary inhabitants of this particular undercity are orcs, a particularly servile breed that spends most of their time morosely performing menial tasks: breeding rothe, cultivating fungi in piles of dung and offal, and keeping the streets clean and the buildings maintained for their wererat masters. The wererats fled to this hidden place centuries ago, possibly from the Catacombs of the Mind, a series of tunnels ruled by cranium rats beneath the Hive Ward. In this new, nameless domain they thrived, feeding on the flesh of young orcs until they grew strong and brave.

At the time they first arrived, the ratmen worshipped the demon prince Orcus. Their shaman-priests wore goat's head masks and dark robes, praying to their wicked patron to deliver undead warriors to avenge them against those who had drove them there. From hidden catacombs beneath the city's central temple, the Dweller Beneath woke from his slumber and secretly observed the inhabitants of his home. After a time, he decided to give them a test.

The Dweller appeared before them, his body transformed into a form that he thought of as godlike: tall, with a rigid, stonelike body and the head of a goat. He slaughtered half of the ratmen on the spot, and asked them which was better: life or undeath.

"Undeath," most of them muttered fearfully, "undeath in servitude to you, great prince."

The Dweller killed half of those remaining. He asked them the question again. One stepped forward and abased himself. "Please," he said, "please, god, I want to live."

The Dweller took him away. A year later he returned, and began training his people and the other shaman-priests in the worship of their new god.

Wererat Culture. The wererats are very civilized on their own turf, using great amounts of silverware of the highest quality (no doubt stolen) for their elaborate feasts. They will invite visitors (anyone stupid enough to wander around the city) to join in their feasts (they will not attack on their own turf unless attacked first; they'd rather backstab in a dark alley than foul up their home). Every year on guvnertime new shaman-priests are chosen after a rite of ascension. After a harrowing night in the tunnels of their master, successful initiates emerge with hideous festering sores and recieve a mask of the Dweller.

These "priests" have been touched by the lich and become mummies of a sort, like their master in resembling undead in some respects while still remaining alive.

After carefully mummifying a dead servant, the Dweller resurrects him using a modified raise dead spell to harness positive energy, binding the creature's ka spirit to its quickened flesh. The reborn wererat loses its dried appearance, becoming sleek and healthy-looking again; its heart beats, its blood flows, and its lungs pump in and out as they always have before, but its unnatural presence now swims with disease and contagia, minor parasitic spirits harmful to other forms of life. They gain all the powers of a first rank ancient dead. Their masks glow with an erie blue light (with star like points in the eyes) and enable the shaman-priest to use 1 magic missle each round; they lose their enchantment when taken from whom they are bestowed upon. Possession of a mask without the proper rites will transform the owner after a week of fevers and great sickness, creating a ka-ghoul.

Ka-Mummies: CR 3; Medium Monstrous Humanoid (3'-6'); HD6d8+12; hp 34; Init +1 (Dex); Spd 30 ft; AC 19 (+1 Dex, +8 natural); Atk +6 melee (slam 1d6+4); Face 5 ft. x 5 ft.; Reach 5 ft.; SA Aura of Menace, mummy bloom; SQ Damage reduction 5/+1, Immunities; SR 2; AL LE; SV Fort +6, Ref +4, Will +7; Str 17, Dex 13, Con 19, Int 15, Wis 14, Cha 16 Skills: Hide +10, Listen +9, Move Silently +10, Spot +9 Feats: Alertness, Toughness SA - Aura of Menace: (Su): Those in the company of a ka-mummy feel a powerful force radiating about them in tense situations. Any hostile creature within a 20-foot radius must succeed at a Will save (DC 14) to resist its effects. Those who fail suffer a -2 morale penalty to attacks, AC, and saves for one day or until they successfully hit the ka-mummy that generated the aura. A creature that has resisted or broken the effect cannot be affected again by a ka-mummy's aura for one day. SA - Immunities (Ex): Ka-mummies are immune to mind-affecting attacks. They have no need to eat, sleep, or breathe. SA - Mummy Bloom (Su): Supernatural disease--slam, Fortitude save (DC 20), incubation period 1 day; victim is consumed by dimly glowing mold, losing 1 point of constitution per day. At Constitution 0, the corpse of the victim erupts in pale blossoms, dripping with blood.

Ka-Ghouls: CR 1; Medium Monstrous Humanoid; HD1d8+3; 4 hp; Init +2 (Dex); Spd 30 ft; AC 14 (+2 Dex, +2 natural )); Atk +0/+0 melee (1d6+1 bite) or (1d4 [x2] claws); l Face 5 ft. x 5 ft.; Reach 5 ft.; SA Mummy Bloom; SQ Immunities; AL CE; SV Fort +4, Ref +4, Will +5; Str 13, Dex 13, Con 15, Int 13, Wis 14, Cha 16 Skills: Hide +6, Listen +5, Move Silently +6, Spot +5 Feats: Alertness, Toughness SA - Immunities (Ex): Ka-ghouls are immune to mind-affecting attacks. They have no need to eat, sleep, or breathe. SA - Mummy Bloom (Su): Supernatural disease--slam, Fortitude save (DC 20), incubation period 1 day; victim is consumed by dimly glowing mold, losing 1 point of constitution per day. At Constitution 0, the corpse of the victim erupts in pale blossoms, dripping with blood.

Militia. Red-robed wererats patrol the few portals to their ward at all times, accompanied by at least one ka-mummy priest at all times. The head of the militia is the priest Girk (Pl/Male Wererat Ka-Mummy/CE), a sensitive soul with a fondness for creatures with tentacles.

Services. The Wererat Ward produces little, except for food, although quite a lot goes missing from surrounding communities in Sigil. Orc meat is generally prepared as bits of stingy meat tossed in beans and rice and cooked in orcish blood. The favorite drink is fermented orc milk abtained from the nursing mothers. Orc meat tastes like smokey shark steak.

Local News. Comparatively recently a shadow fiend named Tattershade captured one of the goat masks the rat-priests wear. Tattershade, being a fiend, reacted strangely to it, transforming into what it is today - the self-proclaimed King of the Rats. The magic that makes the priests the undisputed leaders of the local wererats does the same for Tattershade, and it now rules many wererat gangs of its own. Often it is only the horned, skull-like mask that people see, floating in clusters of darkness. Still it looks over its insubstantial shoulder, afraid the ka-lich will notice one of its toys are gone.

The triumphant return of the Five-Bands Company from the pits of Baator was made much of last year, but the tale they told of their journey back is spoken of much more rarely, as if Cagers fear that telling the story will make it true, or attract the attention of those it concerns. The Five-Bands tell of a gate none had discovered before, leading deep within Sigil's bowels to a city dominated by wererats who seem to worship plague itself. They whisper of the strange courtesy their hosts extended to them even as they slaughtered their orcish slaves with weapons of life. Further, they claim that Lharic, the lost mother of the mad former Bleaker factol Lhar, is alive and laboring for the wererats beneath the city. His father, her husband Paul, has apparently been infected with rat-lycanthropy.

The Five-Bands finish their story by telling of their effort to find a gatekey to return to Sigil's surface, and their final battle against the red-robed guards. The Bleakers have no comment on the story. "What does it matter?" asked a spokesmen. "The rats stole my virtue!" said Lhar, clearly gibbering.

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